Home Today's Paper Most Popular Video Gallery Photo Gallery
Subscription Blog Signin Register
Logo
Monday, May 21, 2018 05:04:57 PM
Follow Us On: Facebook Twitter Twitter Twitter Twitter

Learning to love a multipolar world

By
05th-Jan-2017       
Comments
Share your thought
Post a comment »
Read all () »

Jeffrey D. Sachs :
American foreign policy is at a crossroads. The United States has been an expanding power since its start in 1789. It battled its way across North America in the nineteenth century and gained global dominance in the second half of the twentieth. But now, facing China's rise, India's dynamism, Africa's soaring populations and economic stirrings, Russia's refusal to bend to its will, its own inability to control events in the Middle East, and Latin America's determination to be free of its de facto hegemony, US power has reached its limits.
One path for the US is global cooperation. The other is a burst of militarism in response to frustrated ambitions. The future of the US, and of the world, hangs on this choice.
Global cooperation is doubly vital. Only cooperation can deliver peace and the escape from a useless, dangerous, and ultimately bankrupting new arms race, this time including cyber-weapons, space weapons, and next-generation nuclear weapons. And only cooperation can enable humanity to face up to urgent planetary challenges, including the destruction of biodiversity, the poisoning of the oceans, and the threat posed by global warming to the world's food supply, vast drylands, and heavily populated coastal regions.
Yet global cooperation means the willingness to reach agreements with other countries, not simply to make unilateral demands of them. And the US is in the habit of making demands, not making compromises. When a state feels destined to rule - as with ancient Rome, the Chinese "Middle Kingdom" centuries ago, the British Empire from 1750 to 1950, and the US since World War II - compromise is hardly a part of its political vocabulary. As former US President George W. Bush succinctly put it, "You're either with us or against us."
Not surprisingly, then, the US is finding it hard to accept the clear global limits that it is confronting. In the wake of the Cold War, Russia was supposed to fall in line; but President Vladimir Putin did not oblige. Likewise, rather than bringing stability on US terms, America's covert and overt wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, South Sudan, and elsewhere created a firestorm stretching across the greater Middle East.
China was supposed to show gratitude and deference to the US for the right to catch up from 150 years of abuse by Western imperial powers and Japan. Instead, China has the audacity to think that it is an Asian power with responsibilities of its own.
There is a fundamental reason, of course, for these limits. At WWII's end, the US was the only major power not destroyed by the war. It led the world in science, technology, and infrastructure. It constituted perhaps 30% of the world economy and formed the cutting edge of every high-tech sector. It organized the postwar international order: the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, the Marshall Plan, the reconstruction of Japan, and more.
Under that order, the rest of the world has closed much of the vast technological, educational, and infrastructural gap with the US. As economists say, global growth has been "convergent," meaning that poorer countries have been catching up. The share of the world economy represented by the US has declined by roughly half (to around 16% currently). China now has a larger economy in absolute terms than the US, though still only around one-fourth the size in per capita terms.
None of this catching up was a perfidious trick against the US or at its expense. It was a matter of basic economics: given peace, trade, and a global flow of ideas, poorer countries can get ahead. This tendency is to be welcomed, not shunned.
But if the global leader's mindset is one of domination, the results of catch-up growth will look threatening, which is how many US "security strategists" view them. Suddenly, open trade, long championed by the US, looks like a dire threat to its continued dominance. Fear-mongers are calling for the US to close itself off to Chinese goods and Chinese companies, claiming that global trade itself undermines American supremacy.
My former Harvard colleague and leading US diplomat Robert Blackwill and former State Department adviser Ashley Tellis expressed their unease in a report published last year. The US has consistently pursued a grand strategy "focused on acquiring and maintaining preeminent power over various rivals," they wrote, and "primacy ought to remain the central objective of US grand strategy in the twenty-first century." But "China's rise thus far has already bred geopolitical, military, economic, and ideological challenges to US power, US allies, and the US-dominated international order," Blackwill and Tellis noted. "Its continued, even if uneven, success in the future would further undermine US national interests."
US President-elect Donald Trump's newly named trade adviser Peter Navarro agrees. "Whenever we buy products made in China," he wrote last year of the US and its allies, "we as consumers are helping to finance a Chinese military buildup that may well mean to do us and our countries harm."
With just 4.4% of the world's population and a falling share of world output, the US might try to hang on to its delusion of global dominance through a new arms race and protectionist trade policies. Doing so would unite the world against US arrogance and the new US military threat. The US would sooner rather than later bankrupt itself in a classic case of "imperial overreach."
The only sane way forward for the US is vigorous and open global cooperation to realize the potential of twenty-first-century science and technology to slash poverty, disease, and environmental threats. A multipolar world can be stable, prosperous, and secure. The rise of many regional powers is not a threat to the US, but an opportunity for a new era of prosperity and constructive problem solving.

(Jeffrey D. Sachs, Professor of Sustainable Development, Professor of Health Policy and Management, and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, is also Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network).
Courtesy: Project Syndicate

Tariff
Add Rate

News Archive

Inside The New Nation

Editorial »

RAB must not prove we are unfit to save life of our own citizens


IN the last 15 days, nine alleged criminals were killed during "gunfight" with Rapid Action Battalion (RAB). Of them, three alleged drug traders were killed in Jassore early Friday, according to a newspaper report. Besides, six other people were killed in shootouts with RAB in different parts of the country, ...

Entertainment »

Shaon renders song under Nachiketa’s composition


Entertainment Report :Meher Afroze Shaon is popularly known as both an actress and a singer. Few days ago, she gave her voice for a playback song. Till now the listeners did not hear the song. After Eid, Shaon is coming with that song. For the first time Shaon has rendered ...

Sports »

Germany`s Alexander Zverev reacts after winning a point to Croatia's Marin Cilic during their semifinal match at the Italian Open tennis tournament in Rome on Saturday.


Football »

Union rout Real Salt Lake 4-1


AP, Chester :Marcus Epps and Borek Dockal scored in the first half and the Philadelphia Union added two more in the second to beat Real Salt Lake 4-1 on Saturday night.Fabrice-Jean Picault had a 40-yard run up the left channel to set up the opening goal in the 21st minute, ...

City »

DMP Mobile Court conducted drive in city's 9 New Market 'Fast Food' Pizza Fried Rice Shops, penalises Taka four lakh 30 thousand for preparing rotten food. This photo was taken on Sunday.


International »

Cleric Sadr meets Iraq PM Abadi, hinting at coalition


Reuters, Baghdad  :Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi met with Moqtada al-Sadr on Saturday, less than 24 hours after the Shi'ite cleric's bloc was declared winner of Iraq's parliamentary election, the clearest sign yet they could work together to form a coalition."During our meeting, we agreed to work together and with ...

Sports »

Toronto FC forward Jordan Hamilton (22) and Orlando City defender Mohamed El-Munir (13) chase the bouncing ball during the first half of an MLS soccer match in Toronto on Friday.


Sports »

Jordan Spieth watches his tee shot on the first hole during the second round of the AT&T Byron Nelson golf tournament at Trinity Forest Golf Club in Dallas on Friday.


Entertainment »

Raazi`s first week collections become the 5th highest of 2018


Raazi has been sailing smoothly on its journey towards the prestigious Rs 100 crore club and it will be no shocker if the film grosses over it. The cast and crew of the film recently held an event to celebrate the success of the film with the media as well ...

Entertainment »

Kareena says she'll never be on social media


Shashanka Gosh's Veere Di Wedding is all set to bring the gorgeous Kareena Kapoor Khan back to the big screen after a gap of two years. The actress took a break after giving birth to Bollywood's most popular toddler Taimur Ali Khan. Kareena will be seen alongside Sonam Kapoor, Swara ...

City »

BNP Standing Committee Member Dr Khondkar Mosharraf Hossain speaking at a discussion on 'Acceptable Election and Role of the Present Election Commission' organised by 'Nagorik Adhikar Andolon Forum' at the Jatiya Press Club on Saturday.


Editorial »

Myanmar will take back their people: We are unconcerned about the terrorists


AS the monsoon threatens the Rohingya refugees with the outbreak of vector-borne epidemics and diarrhoeal diseases, the repatriation process seems to be getting more and more complex. However, Bangladeshi officials at a meeting in Dhaka on Thursday urged Myanmar to hand over a 'specific list' of members of Arakan Rohingya ...

International »

White House pushes ahead with Mideast peace plan


AP, Washington  :The Trump administration is aiming to roll out its much-hyped but long-delayed Middle East peace plan next month amid signs it may further alienate the Palestinians by slashing millions of dollars in funding for humanitarian and development projects in the West Bank and Gaza.Five U.S. officials and a ...

Editorial »

Don`t ignore the UNHRC`s report : Be respectful to human rights and be with the people


THE UN Human Rights Council (HRC) has adopted a draft report on the human rights review of Bangladesh, with recommendations on taking steps to deter forced disappearances, extra judicial killings, and to ensure freedom of expression in media, politics and religion. During the 30th Session of the Universal Periodic Review ...

Football »

Richet Gomez of Bolivia's The Strongest (left) fights for the ball with Guzman Pereira of Uruguay's Penarol during a Copa Libertadores soccer game in Montevideo, Uruguay on Thursday.


.

 
Items that you save may be read at any time on your computer, iPad, iPhone or Android devices.
 
Are you new to our website? Do you have already an account at our website?
Create An Account Log in here
Email this news to a friend or like someone
Email:
Write a comment to this news