Home Today's Paper Most Popular Video Gallery Photo Gallery
Subscription Blog Signin Register
Logo
Sunday, August 20, 2017 12:02:46 PM
Follow Us On: Facebook Twitter Twitter Twitter Twitter

What's holding Arab women back from achieving equality?

By
13th-Mar-2017       Readers ( 124 )   0 Comments
Comments
Share your thought
Post a comment »
Read all (0) »

Lina Abirafeh :
The UAE serves as a guiding light in the region. Women here are economically empowered and have more representation in government
No country in the world has achieved full gender equality, but the Arab region - a diverse grouping of 22 countries in the Middle East and North Africa - ranks the lowest in the world, according to the 2016 Global Gender Gap Report. Despite some advances in women's economic equality in Qatar, Algeria and the United Arab Emirates, at the present rate the region's 39 per cent gender gap (compared to 33 per cent in South Asia and 32 per cent in Sub-Saharan Africa) will take another 356 years to close. Worse still, between the patriarchal societies, increased conservative movements and lack of political will to move towards gender equity, the Arab world today is seeing a backlash against women's rights and freedoms.
As the Executive Secretary for UN Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA), Rima Khalaf, said to commemorate International Women's Day in 2016, "We are celebrating the many achievements of Arab women in sciences, literature and arts, but primarily in the art of survival."
Here are the top five barriers facing women in the Arab world this year, along with some bright spots on the horizon. Women of the region are, of course, not all the same, but many face these profound challenges.
Ongoing conflict
For many Arab countries, instability is becoming a norm. The region's multiple protracted humanitarian crises, including those in Syria, Palestine and Iraq, have destroyed systems of social protection, reduced access to safe services and support, displaced communities, and increased vulnerabilities.
Emergencies are more dangerous for women. Women are deliberately targeted. Moreover, conflicts also bring insecurities that compel women to resort to risky sources of income such as trafficking in order to survive.
The threat of violence is particularly high for young women and women of ethnic minorities, according to the 2016 Arab Human Development Report. For all women, but these in particular, even escaping conflict does not necessarily bring safety.
Research shows that the biggest predictor of peace in a country is not economics or politics, but how the country treats its women in times of conflict. Yet gender equality goals quickly disappear from the agenda. And, in a situation all too common around the world, Arab women generally do not have a seat at the table or a voice in negotiating their nations' peace.
Gender-based violence
One in three women worldwide has experienced some form of gender-based violence in her lifetime. In the Arab world, violence against women takes many forms, with intimate partner violence being the most common (affecting approximately 30 per cent of women in the region) and the least reported. Here, intimate partner violence is often not labelled as such. When it is, social stigma and family and community pressures keep women from reporting it.
Honour killings are also prevalent in many Arab countries, which have largely failed to amend relevant laws. Jordan has the highest percentage in the region: each year it registers between 15 and 20 reports of such crimes. Finally, in countries that host Syrian refugees, child marriage is increasing as a response to the ongoing crisis.
But we are seeing progress.
One way to counter violence against women in the Arab world is increasing its visibility among youth - as a student video competition for the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence - has done.
Another promising initiative is a robust study led by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) to estimate the regional cost of violence against women. The aim is to use economic arguments to raise awareness and influence policy.
Other organisations such as the regional civil association ABAAD's Al Dar (emergency shelters) are providing a safe environment for survivors of gender-based violence, and those at risk, to access services and support. These are promising emerging practices, although uncommon in the region.
Economic (dis)empowerment
Women in Arab countries are an underutilised economic force with only 24 per cent working outside the home - that's among the lowest female employment rates in the world.
Most women who work outside the home are relegated to traditionally feminised sectors. In cases where women are accessing male-dominated fields, traditional gender dynamics remain firmly entrenched. So women are promoted less and have little access to decision-making positions.
While men's employment is a prerequisite to marriage, women's employment often ends with marriage; being married is viewed as a disadvantage in the workplace as well.
There are strong economic incentives to change these practices. Globally, gender equality results in higher GDP - more workers means more productivity. But the strongest argument of all is principle. This is a woman's right - and it is the right thing to do.
Vocational training, micro-lending, business planning, access to markets, and other supportive measures would help bring women into the labour market. As would addressing factors, such as lack of access to (safe) transport, safety in public spaces and daycare, all of which place limits on women's employment prospects.
Lack of political participation
Arab women still lag significantly behind in terms of women's participation and representation in politics. According to the WEF, only 9 per cent of the political gender gap is closed. Four of the world's five lowest-ranking countries are in this region, including Oman, Lebanon, Kuwait and Qatar. They have closed less than 3 per cent of their political gender gap.
Only the United Arab Emirates has seen improvement in terms of increased women parliamentarians.
In Lebanon, women currently occupy just four parliamentary seats, 3 per cent of ministerial positions, and around 5 per cent of seats in municipal councils. But information on women's political positions is often incomplete, as these statistics are counted manually from municipality to municipality.
This lack of political participation is largely due to cultural barriers, a lack of access to economic and financial resources, and the absence of successful active role models in politics.
Restrictive family laws
Despite critiques of women's legal status in the Arab region, changing family patterns, and a booming young female adult population, aspiring to professional lives, family laws in Arab countries still endorse inequality between spouses and discriminate against women in all aspects of their lives.
This is a key obstacle to sustainable development, preventing women's self-determination and contribution to public and productive life and reforms have been slow and uneven across the Arab region.
Since 2000, Egypt has introduced a series of legal changes, but to little effect. This includes no-fault divorce, where women can initiate divorce. However, the consequence is that they lose any right to financial support and must repay the dowry they received upon marriage. Family courts were established in 2004, but a holistic approach to family law reform is still lacking as these courts continue to perpetrate the same archaic and discriminatory laws.
In 2004, a reform of Morocco's Moudawana (family code) similarly increased women's right to divorce and child custody and also restricted polygamy. But the Moroccan government remains hesitant to actually implement these reforms.
In Lebanon, reform efforts face unique challenges due to the diversity of its 15 separate personal status laws for the country's various officially recognised religious communities, of which there are 18 in total. But the ongoing refugee crisis, in which at least 1.4 million Syrian refugees have come to Lebanon, is an urgent reminder that conflict, war, and forced migration continue to reinforce the need for legal protection for women.
Still, there is potential for reform within challenging Arab contexts - whether during conflict, post-conflict, or when stable. Future policies for women must build on Arab activism and academic scholarship to reform family laws using a human rights framework and aligning with global goals (such as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women) to build a foundation for full equality.
These issues are overlapping, meaning progress - or regress - in any of these areas has an impact on many other aspects of women's lives. The underlying message is this: unless we're addressing inequalities everywhere, we will achieve equality nowhere.

(Lina Abirafeh is Director, Institute for Women's Studies in the Arab World, Lebanese American University).

0 Comments. Share your thoughts also.
Write a comment
Tariff
Add Rate

News Archive

Inside The New Nation

Cricket »

Members of Australian Cricket team during their practice session at the Sher-e-Bangla National Cricket Stadium in Mirpur on Saturday.


Sports »

Farah bids to give British fans memorable farewell


British athletics great Mo Farah will hope his final track race on home turf on Sunday will have a happier ending than last Saturday's world 5,000 metres final. The 34-year-old, who will compete in the 3,000 metres at the Diamond League meeting in Birmingham, produced a courageous performance just falling ...

Editorial »

Berlin confce to protect Sundarbans


A EUROPEAN conference on Sundarbans started in German capital Berlin yesterday to discuss how to protect the world's greatest mangrove forest from destruction at a time when our government is determined to continue with the construction of the giant Rampal Coal-fired Plant. It is being built as a joint venture ...

Entertainment »

Sonam to act in the film adaptation of The Zoya Factor


Sonam Kapoor had reportedly signed on for the movie adaptation of Anuja Chauhan's Battle For Bittora opposite Fawad Khan. But the film never materialised as relations between India and Pakistan soured. Now, the buzz is that she's been signed on for another movie adaptation of Anuja Chauhan's The Zoya Factor.  ...

City »

Road Transport and Bridges Minister Obaidul Quader, among others, at a discussion on 42nd martyrdom anniversary of Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and National Mourning Day organised by Bangladesh Awami Juba League in the auditorium of the city's Engineers' Institution on Saturday.


International »

India wildlife reserve park devastated by monsoon floods


AP, Guahati :Rising floodwaters have inundated large parts of a famous wildlife reserve park in northeastern India, killing more than 225 animals and forcing hundreds of other animals to flee, the park director said Saturday.Around 15 rhinos, 185 deer and at least one Royal Bengal tiger have died in the ...

Editorial »

Import is not enough; make sure people get rice at low cost


THE country is apparently facing acute food shortage; which is evident from a government decision to increase food grains import to 20 lakh tonnes this year from earlier announced import at 11 lakh tonnes. The cause of the sudden rise in import is that the country has lost over 20 ...

Sports »

Thailand`s Pornchai Kaokaew (center) kicks a ball against Indonesia's Saiful Rijai (left) and Syamsul Hadi during the men's Sepak Takraw Regu competition at South East Asian Games in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Friday.


.

Entertainment »

Friends & Family bring in Sangeeta Ahir`s birthday with a bang


Even though once and still considered a taboo, Suicide and depression are rarely the theme of films in Indian cinema. Depression is alarmingly rising in the youth and adults in India making it a major cause of concern. Depression is usually caused by traumatic experiences, bad relationships, anxiety, and low ...

International »

Civilian deaths surge in Raqqa as IS tactics slow US-backed advances


VOA News :As U.S.-backed forces continue to make slow progress in their offensive to oust Islamic State (IS) from its self-proclaimed capital of Raqqa, thousands of civilians who are trapped in the city face an increasing danger of getting caught in crossfire, rights organizations and local activists warn.Officials from the ...

City »

Ameer of Islami Andolon Bangladesh Mufti Syed Muhammad Rejaul Karim, Pirshaheb Charmonai addressing a rally organised in front of its office in the city by Islami Shashantantra Chhatra Andolon on Friday in protest against effort to snatch independence of judiciary.


.

Editorial »

Weak construction of highways and public safety


MOST of the national highways and local roads are severely battered now by torrential recent rains, floods and from lack of regular maintenance. They are in a dilapidated condition - much to the worries of holidaymakers ahead of Eid-ul-Azha. The pothole worries not only linked to unrelenting jams resulting from ...

Cricket »

Sri Lankan Cricket President Thilanga Sumathipala (left) speaks as Chief Selector Sanath Jayasuriya watches during a media briefing ahead of the One-Day International cricket match series against India in Colombo, Sri Lanka on Wednesday.


Entertainment »

Kriti Sanon unleash her Bitti avatar


'Bareilly Ki Barfi' is undoubtedly one of the most awaited films of the year. The refreshing and pleasing storyline has got everyone hooked to witness the drama that unfolds in this small town set film. What has got everyone intrigued is the lead character of the film, 'Bitti'. As we ...

International »

Flood marooned people in Indian states, eases in Nepal


AP, Lucknow :Monsoon flooding is easing in Nepal, but the water flowing downriver has worsened floods in northern India and marooned thousands of villagers across the border, officials said Thursday.The existing flood situation was aggravated in Uttar Pradesh state after three rivers became swelled with the waters from Nepal, said ...

 
Items that you save may be read at any time on your computer, iPad, iPhone or Android devices.
 
Are you new to our website? Do you have already an account at our website?
Create An Account Log in here
Email this news to a friend or like someone
Email:
Write a comment to this news