Home Today's Paper Most Popular Video Gallery Photo Gallery
Subscription Blog Signin Register
Logo
Sunday, May 20, 2018 11:44:51 PM
Follow Us On: Facebook Twitter Twitter Twitter Twitter

Helping kids adopt a growth mindset

photo by

By
14th-Jan-2018       
Comments
Share your thought
Post a comment »
Read all () »

Amy L. Eva  :
Some people are just jerks, and not much can be done to change them.
Do you agree with this statement? If your answer is yes, here's something you might consider: Research suggests that believing in the human capacity to change is linked to less depression, better health, and greater achievement.
This is the "growth mindset," an idea pioneered by Stanford researcher Carol Dweck. It's the opposite of a "fixed mindset," the idea that people are born either smart or not, kind or not, strong or not-and people just don't change all that much.
According to this research, when we practice a growth mindset, the obstacles we're facing seem more surmountable. It's crucial for us to realize that we are not helpless; we can grow and adapt. Just as important as seeing ourselves as capable of growth, however, is the belief that someone who is challenging us can change, too. This perspective releases some of the pressure we might feel, and helps us to think more in terms of challenges than threats.
We shouldn't only believe in the ability of other people to change for their benefit, however. We are the ones who stand the most to gain when we see possibilities in others. For example, one recent study found that teens who learned about the growth mindset in relation to bullying-hearing that bullies could change, and no one was stuck as an aggressor or victim-were more resilient to social stress.
Even when they got ignored or felt shy, for example, they didn't become overwhelmed or physically stressed out. Seven months later, they were even getting better grades.
That's a fairly easy idea to suggest, and perhaps you already believe in it. But if you're a parent or educator, the challenge lies in helping kids to see the advantages and the ways that it can be applied to their lives and relationships. Here are some tips for helping kids turn a fixed mindset into a growth one.
How to explain the social benefits
Although there is some controversy over the misapplication of mindset research in schools, a growing number of studies suggest that fostering a growth mindset (also known as an "incremental theory of personality") helps students to better navigate social challenges.
Improved peer relationships: A simple belief in the possibility of change may have a powerful effect on our thinking-potentially freeing us to actually see our way through anxiety and a sense of failure in the midst of peer conflict and peer exclusion. Research also indicates that believing personalities can change can lower aggression and retaliatory behavior.
Empathy: A growth mindset can prompt us to put in the effort to empathize more-particularly when it's challenging. If we are struggling to understand that so-called "jerk" in our lives, we might be able to say to ourselves, "This person may be having a rough time right now, but she may change her behavior over time."
Cooperation: Finally, if we believe that personalities are malleable and situations can change, we can also apply this thinking to groups. Israeli and Palestinian teens who were taught the simple idea that groups of people can also change demonstrated increased cooperation in a joint tower-building task. They showed more positive emotions and built a much higher tower than the control group participants in the study.
"Believing in the human capacity to change is linked to less depression, better health, and greater achievement."
Although the basic message above seems to yield numerous social benefits, researchers caution us not to default to oversimplified "people-can-change" platitudes as we share information about the growth mindset. It's not okay to put all the burden on someone who is being bullied or otherwise facing unfair circumstances. When we address bullying and victimization, both bullies and bystanders must be part of the conversation-and the solution.
Three ways to teach a growth mindset
Many growth mindset studies feature brief reading and writing activities where participants learn about our human potential for growth, apply their learning, and share it with others. If you would like to recreate a similar learning experience at home or in your classroom, here are some elements you might include.
Talk about bullying and social exclusion: Why do bullies bully? Are victims always victims? What traits do bullies and victims share? Can bullies or victims change? The goal here is to challenge black-and-white views of "bullies" and "victims." Exploring these questions can help us realize that neither bullies nor victims are fundamentally flawed or fated to always remain in their role.
Explore growth vs. fixed mindsets: With the help of these two videos, you can introduce the concept of neuroplasticity and what it means to hold a growth vs. a fixed mindset. Viewers should start to understand how believing that people's abilities and traits can change makes us more motivated and optimistic about solving problems. Then, you can apply these concepts to the idea of bullying: Can bullies and victims grow and change? How can we shift some of our fixed ideas about them-He's a bad person; No one likes me-to more flexible ones?
Reinforce learning through teaching: Research demonstrates that learning and comprehension can be significantly enhanced when you get to teach what you are learning. Invite older children or teens to develop several tips and discussion questions about the growth mindset. Then find a time when they can share these key ideas with younger children (or siblings).
Obstacles to growth
Consider the following cautions and clarifications from mindset researcher Carol Dweck:
You can't have a growth mindset all the time: It's important to note that a growth mindset isn't a personal attribute or state of being, it's a way of thinking or a coping strategy that we can apply in a given situation. It is not something you simply have or you don't.
We all experience fixed mindsets, too: Everyone is a mix of both fixed and growth mindsets, and no one person has a pure growth mindset all the time. If we want to benefit from a growth mindset, we need to understand how both a fixed and growth mindset can play out in different situations. For example, a growth mindset can come in handy in situations where we experience anxiety or a sense of failure.
Beware of your triggers: However, sometimes it's really challenging to access a growth mindset. Fixed-mindset triggers such as feeling threatened, compared, or criticized can make us feel defensive and insecure so that it can be difficult to believe in the capacity for change. Fixed mindsets can also spark negative self-conscious emotions like shame, which can spark signs of stress in the body as we react to potential threats.
Studies suggest that growth mindsets counter the fight-or-flight response, helping us to view social problems as challenges. This helps us to adapt, change, and grow-the chief characteristics of resilience. When we promote the belief that people truly have the potential to change, we free up ourselves and others to actually do that.
GreaterGood Tiny Logo Greater Good wants to know: Do you think this article will influence your opinions or behavior?
(Amy L. Eva, Ph.D., is the education content specialist at the Greater Good Science Center. She writes for the center's online magazine, facilitates the Summer Institute for Educators, and consults on the development of GGSC education resources).

Tariff
Add Rate

News Archive

Inside The New Nation

Sports »

Toronto FC forward Jordan Hamilton (22) and Orlando City defender Mohamed El-Munir (13) chase the bouncing ball during the first half of an MLS soccer match in Toronto on Friday.


Sports »

Jordan Spieth watches his tee shot on the first hole during the second round of the AT&T Byron Nelson golf tournament at Trinity Forest Golf Club in Dallas on Friday.


Entertainment »

Raazi`s first week collections become the 5th highest of 2018


Raazi has been sailing smoothly on its journey towards the prestigious Rs 100 crore club and it will be no shocker if the film grosses over it. The cast and crew of the film recently held an event to celebrate the success of the film with the media as well ...

Entertainment »

Kareena says she'll never be on social media


Shashanka Gosh's Veere Di Wedding is all set to bring the gorgeous Kareena Kapoor Khan back to the big screen after a gap of two years. The actress took a break after giving birth to Bollywood's most popular toddler Taimur Ali Khan. Kareena will be seen alongside Sonam Kapoor, Swara ...

City »

BNP Standing Committee Member Dr Khondkar Mosharraf Hossain speaking at a discussion on 'Acceptable Election and Role of the Present Election Commission' organised by 'Nagorik Adhikar Andolon Forum' at the Jatiya Press Club on Saturday.


Editorial »

Myanmar will take back their people: We are unconcerned about the terrorists


AS the monsoon threatens the Rohingya refugees with the outbreak of vector-borne epidemics and diarrhoeal diseases, the repatriation process seems to be getting more and more complex. However, Bangladeshi officials at a meeting in Dhaka on Thursday urged Myanmar to hand over a 'specific list' of members of Arakan Rohingya ...

International »

White House pushes ahead with Mideast peace plan


AP, Washington  :The Trump administration is aiming to roll out its much-hyped but long-delayed Middle East peace plan next month amid signs it may further alienate the Palestinians by slashing millions of dollars in funding for humanitarian and development projects in the West Bank and Gaza.Five U.S. officials and a ...

Editorial »

Don`t ignore the UNHRC`s report : Be respectful to human rights and be with the people


THE UN Human Rights Council (HRC) has adopted a draft report on the human rights review of Bangladesh, with recommendations on taking steps to deter forced disappearances, extra judicial killings, and to ensure freedom of expression in media, politics and religion. During the 30th Session of the Universal Periodic Review ...

Football »

Richet Gomez of Bolivia's The Strongest (left) fights for the ball with Guzman Pereira of Uruguay's Penarol during a Copa Libertadores soccer game in Montevideo, Uruguay on Thursday.


.

City »

Muslim devotees offering munajat seeking divine blessings at the first Jum'a in Ramzan. The snap was taken from the city's Baitul Mukarram National Mosque.


.

Entertainment »

Sonia round the month of Ramzan


Sheikh Arif Bulbon :On the occasion of holy Ramzan, different TV channels are being aired various programmes to focus on the month. From day one of Ramzan popular TV actress, model and host Sonia Hossain has been hosting a daily show titled Lux Style File on Banglavision at 6:45pm. A ...

International »

Kachin civilians flee Myanmar`s `forgotten war`


AFP, Danai :Seng Moon grabbed her day-old baby and fled into the thick jungle, joining thousands of villagers escaping fighting between ethnic Kachin rebels and Myanmar's army, now reinforced by a unit notorious for its brutal "clearance" operations.The insurgency in Myanmar's remote northeast has festered for six decades, but unlike ...

Back Page »

Welcome Holy Ramzan


Abdul Muqit Chowdhury :The Holy month of Ramzan, the ninth month of lunar Arabic calendar, has arrived in our midst. The sighting of the crescent moon has brought with it the fragrance of the golden period of Rahmat (blessings), Maghfirat (forgiveness) and Nazat (salvation). A solemn occasion of complete surrender ...

Editorial »

Bangladesh supports Palestinian's legislative demand


NEWS media reported that Bangladesh is going to attend an extraordinary summit of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference (OIC) in Istanbul on Friday, which will discuss a response to the recent opening of the new US embassy in Jerusalem. The OIC has termed the US move a "clear violation" ...

Cricket »

Disgraced Warner to play Sydney club cricket


Disgraced former Australian vice-captain David Warner will start his road to redemption by playing club cricket with Sydney's Randwick Petersham, officials said. The opener is serving a year-long ban from state and international cricket for his part in a plan to use sandpaper to tamper with the ball during the ...

 
Items that you save may be read at any time on your computer, iPad, iPhone or Android devices.
 
Are you new to our website? Do you have already an account at our website?
Create An Account Log in here
Email this news to a friend or like someone
Email:
Write a comment to this news