Home Today's Paper Most Popular Video Gallery Photo Gallery
Subscription Blog Signin Register
Logo
Tuesday, August 14, 2018 09:29:51 PM
Follow Us On: Facebook Twitter Twitter Twitter Twitter

Secret ingredients for a cool summer

photo by

By
01st-Jun-2018       
Comments
Share your thought
Post a comment »
Read all () »

Weekend Plus Desk :
With the mercury soaring, days of heat and dust are upon us. Beat the heat with the cold comfort of seasonal produce and time-tested recipes.
When the sun beams brighter than the dazzling amaltas in the sub-continent, it cues the onset of sultry days. Those who have spent summertime in India know that it doesn't cede its hold up till nearly September; its spell broken only by fleeting dust storms and showers. The Indian summer has always been unrelenting, and with climate change and soaring temperatures, how does one keep cool in a season whose vagaries claim lives every year and whose less dire consequences include exhaustion, dehydration, diarrhoea, syncope (fainting) or rashes?
The answer, perhaps, lies in our ancient texts which have detailed accounts of season-appropriate fare in a land where the cuisines morph from region to region.
“The Charakasamhita, an Ayurvedic text written by Charaka around the first century BC, contains detailed instructions on eating and keeping healthy,” writes Chitrita Banerji in Life and Food in Bengal (Penguin, 2005). Easy ways to circumvent India’s torrid temperatures are prescribed in Ayurveda, which ascribes an innate potency or taseer to every food. Gauged by its impact on the body, the food may either be cooling or heat-inducing. Unlike in the West, where the concept of cold food largely encompasses salads and cold cuts, in India, food characterised as cold is considered as such, and thought as apt for the summer months, not only for their cooling effect on the body, but also because they are easy on the digestive system and effectual detoxifiers.
Nutritionist, weight management consultant and health writer Kavita Devgan, says, “While Ayurveda goes deeper into the study of a particular food's natural properties, we follow a few guiding principles based on traditional wisdom to identify which food will be cooling to the body - it should be hydrating, easily digestible and detoxifying.”
The summer months suck electrolytes from our bodies and foods considered detoxifying, such as the summer specials watermelon, cucumber and berries, “not only help avoid diseases due to a toxic overload but also gets perspiration going, enabling our body to cool down on its own,” she adds.
This concept of ‘cold’ food has trickled down to most Indian kitchens. “I remember my grandmother, and later, my mother, often saying that certain foods heat up or cool the stomach. Things that cooled the stomach were not necessarily cool themselves - ice-cream and too much mango, we were told, in the summer could give you pet gorom (upset stomach),” says author Devapriya Roy. Her summer memories include a light fish stew or a patla maachher jhol - even the unforgiving heat doesn’t deter a Bengali’s obsession with fish - that was consumed with a dash of lime. “This was made with rohu in my house and was a summer staple. There was also this Aamer Jhol - a light, watery dish made with raw mangoes - that my mother recommended, and, as a child, I always ignored. But now, I yearn for that taste. There was also the classic combination of kalaier dal and alu posto, made especially during the summer months. Urad dal and posto (poppy seeds), are both cooling. The latter no doubt helped with an after-lunch nap,” says Roy. Roy’s mother, Manidipa, grew up eating the ‘classic combination’ at her grandmothers’ homes. “In the ‘60s, the time when I was growing up, there were no ACs and houses had one or two fans. I remember many summer lunches comprising these two dishes - kalaier dal with aloo posto. They were delicious and light and easy to digest,” she says.
Indeed, most argue that making the most of seasonal produce is the best way to keep illnesses at bay. And summer's bounty ensures that there is much to pick from - watermelons, berries, plums, peaches, tomatoes and cucumber, are all high in water content and aid digestion. Taken with curd or flattened rice, it’s a desi version of the Western fruit salad.
Summer is also the season for a variety of vegetables - pumpkin, ash gourd, snake gourd, ridged gourd are all known to be cooling. “Ayurvedic practitioners recommend patol (pointed gourd) and two varieties of gourds, karola (bitter gourd) and uchchhe (a variant of bitter gourd),” further writes Banerji. Easy on the digestive system, they are fibrous and protect against heat exhaustion. “We integrate these into our staples such as sambar, parippu curry and erissery. Sambhaaram (spiced buttermilk with curry leaves and ginger) was a regular during summers at home. In fact, we always had a litre or two in the fridge as a refresher given how easy it is to prepare,” says Thomas Fenn, co-owner, Mahabelly.
Regional cuisine in India has always been shaped not just by the topography of the land but also by its history and its climatic conditions. In most regions of India, summer coolers find a place on tables, as tackling dehydration in these months is paramount.
In Kottayam, Kerala, where Fenn grew up, the heat was countered with tall glasses brimming with “sambhaaram, kulkil sharbath (lemon-based drink with tulsi seeds, a natural cooling ingredient) and nannari sharbath (made from the naruneedi root, also a natural coolant). Tender coconut water followed closely,” he says.
Rickety thelas, barely upright under the oppressive sun, begin to dole out glasses of water, lemonade and the popular chaas or chhaachh on Delhi’s streets. “Chhaachh, made by churning yoghurt, which is known to be cooling for the body, is primarily made two ways - with roasted cumin seeds and salt, and the other is plain. Most of the vendors in Delhi come from Haryana and as the summer gets worse, you begin to see more and more of them - from Old Delhi to outside government offices,” says Anubhav Sapra of Delhi Food Walks.
In chef and food consultant Gunjan Goela's home in Delhi, sattu sherbet drinks took predominance. Though most popular in Bihar, sattu is made by powdering roasted gram flour, flavoured with black salt, mint leaves, roasted cumin powder and salt, and is consumed across the state. However, in Goela’s mother’s kitchen, a variation was concocted with pearl millet or bajra instead of black chickpea flour. “My mother is from Rajasthan where bajra is very popular. She would give us bajre ka sattu when it got extremely hot. It was soaked, strained and mixed with boora or khaand (unrefined sugar). Those were the days when refined sugar was not popular in Indian homes and Delhi's proximity to UP, which has several khaand factories, ensured its availability,” she says. Rich in iron, manganese, magnesium and high on insoluble fibre, sattu is also stuffed into parathas or made into the Bihar favourite - litti.
In Rajasthan, where the mercury regularly soars up to 45 degrees Celsius in the summer, sherbet of bael or Bengal quince is a household staple. The globose fruit with a hard rind yields a laxative pulp, sweet and aromatic. “We soak the pulp overnight in water and sieve it the next morning to make a cooler. Sometimes, we add sugar and cardamom to the drink but its sweet enough on its own too.
 Contd on page 5

Tariff
Add Rate

News Archive

Inside The New Nation

Editorial »

Quota reform: Free the students and fulfill their rational demands


CABINET Secretary after weekly Cabinet meeting on Monday told journalists that the committee formed by government to review the existing quota system proposed abolition of almost all the quotas in public services giving priority to talent. However, the court directives will be sought before taking any decision over freedom fighter ...

Cricket »

Ashraful eyes Bangladesh comeback as ban ends


Former Bangladesh captain Mohammad Ashraful said Monday that has set his sights on a comeback with the national side after his five-year ban for match-fixing ended."I am feeling really nice as I was waiting for this day for the last five years. (I told myself) when August 13, 2018 came ...

City »

State Executive Member and Advisor to the BJP President in West Bengal, India Dr Anindya Gopal Mitra called on Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina at her office yesterday afternoon.


Entertainment »

What Sara Ali Khan`s fans demand on her birthday


Even before the debut of her release film Sara Ali Khan is already a popular name amongst the masses. On the occasion of Sara’s Birthday, fans across the nation took Twitter by storm as #HBDSaraAliKhan and #WeWantSaraOnSocialMedia saw a strong India trend. Soon, social media went into a tizzy as ...

Entertainment »

Hichki story has universal resonance: Rani Mukherji


Actress Rani Mukherji, who has bagged the Best Actress Award for Hichki at the Indian Film Festival Melbourne (IFFM), says the film is a story that has universal resonance, and its spirit of positivity won over Indians and locals in Australia. “I feel very proud and thankful that Hichki has ...

International »

Two Koreas agree to hold September summit in Pyongyang


AFP, Seoul :North and South Korea agreed Monday to hold a summit in Pyongyang in September, the South's Yonhap news agency reported following high-level talks in the Demilitarized Zone that divides the peninsula.The two sides "agreed at the meeting to hold a South-North summit in Pyongyang in September as planned", ...

Editorial »

Make the BRTC capable, or shut down its operation


BANGLADESH Road Transport Corporation (BRTC) is now on the verge of collapse due to administrative and financial mismanagement. Newspaper reports said BRTC as per its own estimate incurred a loss of Tk 413 crore in 2016-17 fiscal. When bus transport has become very lucrative business in the private sector with ...

Football »

Choton expects best from her girls against Nepal


Bangladesh U-15 national women's team head coach Golam Robanni Choton said her girls are upbeat to give their hundred percent to win against Nepal in the SAFF U-15 Women's Championship.Bangladesh will face Nepal in their second group B match scheduled to be held today at Changlimithan Football Stadium in Bhutan."We ...

Entertainment »

I saw a chained elephant on a school trip to the zoo and became upset: Dia Mirza


Like any child, actor Dia Mirza, too, was entranced when she first saw an elephant. "The first time I saw an elephant was on the streets of Hyderabad. I was very young and was just so enamored by that sight. It was so unusual to see an elephant in an ...

Entertainment »

Physical appearance is an illusion: Sonakshi Sinha


Actor Sonakshi Sinha, who has been often body-shamed on social media, says there is so much more to a person than their looks and that physical appearance is just an illusion.In a conversation with BIG FM, Sonakshi said, "There is so much more to a person than their looks. I ...

City »

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina laid the foundation stone of an underpass near Shahid Ramij Uddin School and College on Dhaka Airport Road in the city yesterday.


International »

No place for white supremacy, racism, neo-Nazism in US: Ivanka


AFP, Washington : Ivanka Trump, President Donald Trump's daughter and a White House adviser, explicitly condemned "white supremacy, racism and neo-nazism" late Saturday in a manner her father seems reluctant to do.The tweets come on the anniversary of deadly unrest triggered by a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. A ...

Editorial »

Now Home Minister knows how incompetent transport sector is


A RECKLESS bus of 'New Vision Paribahan' which was  driven by its helper hit the Home Minister's car in front of National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases in the city's Sher-e-Bangla Nagar area on Friday night amid the ongoing Traffic Week. The bus hit the car from behind after overtaking one ...

Sports »

General Secretary of Bangladesh Archery Federation Kazi Rajib Uddin Ahmed Chapol addressing a press conference at the Dutch-Bangla Bank Auditorium in Bangladesh Olympic Association Bhaban on Saturday.


Sports »

Nadal stays on track in Toronto with win over Cilic


AFP, Toronto :Rafael Nadal recovered from a slow start, overcoming Marin Cilic 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 as the Spaniard's chase for a long-sought ATP Masters title on hardcourt heated up on Friday.The world number one reached the semi-finals in Toronto and will next face Russian Karen Khachanov, who beat Robin Haase ...

 
Items that you save may be read at any time on your computer, iPad, iPhone or Android devices.
 
Are you new to our website? Do you have already an account at our website?
Create An Account Log in here
Email this news to a friend or like someone
Email:
Write a comment to this news