Home Today's Paper Most Popular Video Gallery Photo Gallery
Subscription Blog Signin Register
Logo
Thursday, November 15, 2018 04:46:18 AM
Follow Us On: Facebook Twitter Twitter Twitter Twitter

Visual patterns: Draw a House-Tree-Person

photo by

By
16th-Aug-2018       
Comments
Share your thought
Post a comment »
Read all () »

Robert Barkman, Ph.D  :
That child's drawing of a house, tree, or person may represent more than an element of the refrigerator-as-art-gallery. It may predict a child's intelligence later in life. A child's intelligence at fourteen years of age may be predicted by how well he or she draws at age four (Arden, 2014). Some 7,000 U.S. children at the age of four were asked to draw-a child. Figures were scored on the presence and correct quantity of human features. The more features pictured, the higher the score. Seven years later, the same children were asked to take an intelligence test. The results from the intelligence test were then related to the results of the drawing test. A pattern was found, suggesting that drawings at 4 years of age could predict later intelligence (Arden, 2014).     
Drawings tell a lot about what we are thinking.  The patterns we draw on paper can lead to the discovery of our biases, feelings, relationships, family, home life, self-esteem, and even intelligence.  They are mirrors to our minds (Buck, 1984). For some pediatricians, it is standard practice to ask children to draw. When children draw, it helps to heal them. It shifts their mental state from stress to serenity. It can inspire a conversation between the pediatrician and child. It is far easier, for example, for a child to talk about his or her drawing than about himself or his feelings (Malchiodi, 2009).
Close your eyes. Picture a scientist in your mind's eye. What is the scientist wearing and holding? Describe the facial features and hair. What kinds of equipment are in the picture? Now, open your eyes, and, quickly draw the scientist!  After you have finished, ask yourself, is the scientist male and white? Does the scientist have wild hair and wear glasses? Is the scientist wearing a lab coat and working in a laboratory surrounded by test tubes, beakers, a microscope, etc. Were you imaging Albert Einstein?   
If you answered yes to most of these questions, your mental image agrees with the visual pattern most people picture when they draw a scientist (Symington, 2006). What is wrong with this picture? The answer is that it stereotypes scientists who are not necessarily male, white, or work in a laboratory.  It confirms what two anthropologists confirmed more than 50 years ago when they tested how more than 3500 high school students pictured a scientist. The most popular image was a study in white and maleness. By the fifth grade, the stereotype of a scientist is already present and persists through adulthood (Finson, Drawing a Scientist: What We Do and Do Not Know After Fifty Years of Drawings, 2014).
Children's art, according to experts, is filled with insights into kids' minds if you know what to look for (Buck, 1984). Therapists use a standard technique to discover how children perceive themselves in the world. It is called draw a house-tree- person (Buck, 1984). It is the projective House-Tree-Person test in which children are asked to draw these three items. The house mirrors the child's home life and family relationships; the tree reflects relationships that the child experiences within his or her environment; and, the person echoes how the child feels about himself.  When children reach six years of age, this is the sweet spot when their drawings really matter.  Visual patterns are clues to their relationship to family and friends, and the environment and the image that children have of themselves (Dewar, 2014).
When, for example, kids draw family members holding hands, it is a good sign of a friendly relationship among the family members. Drawings created with bright colors and happy faces suggest a sense of belonging. When parents are going through conflicts of some sort, the kids will draw the parents far apart. Kids may draw themselves distant from their parents or much smaller relative to their others in the family when there is chaos in the home ranging from clutter to crowding. A child who has been abused might draw an abuser with bigger hands than normal  (How to Analyze a Child's Drawings, 2013).
When kid's drawings were first studied to identify patterns in child development in the 1880's, it was thought that cultural differences mattered little. Because the social world of friends and families is shaped by the culture of the child, we would, however, expect drawings to reflect that. They, in fact, do. Drawings from three different cultures; German upper-class families, Cameroon farming families, and Ankara, Turkey urban middle class families were compared in a recent study (Gernhardt, 2013).
Patterns differed in the depiction of selves and arrangement of family members in several ways. Cameroon children drew families that included members other than their father or mother. The father figure was, in fact, mostly absent. This is consistent with Cameroon culture that is characterized by an extended family of multiple caretakers and family members. This contrasts with Ankara and German drawings that show only the father and mother. Children draw themselves next to their mother and father who are the principal caretakers. In Cameroon, it takes a village. Cameroon children often draw themselves next to non-relatives. Ankara and German children often draw their figures smiling. Cameroon children do not. They are taught to control their emotions and stay emotionally neutral.  It is not surprising that Cameroon children also drew the fewest facial features. It was equally interesting that Ankara children were the only group that drew eyebrows on their figures. It could be because eyebrows are important in the Turkey culture to communicate non-verbally.  Tipping your head forward means 'yes' but lifting your head backwards and raising your eyebrows means 'no (Gernhardt, 2013).' By taking advantage of children's' love to draw, we can learn much about their inner world from the visual patterns they place on paper.

(Robert Barkman, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus Science and Education at Springfield College in Massachusetts).

Tariff
Add Rate

News Archive

Inside The New Nation

Entertainment »

Jaya Ahsan coming with Beauty Circus


Entertainment Report :Jaya Ahsan has already proved herself as an actress not only in Bangladesh but also in Kolkata. Now she is one of the busiest actors in Indian Bangla cinema whose commitment to her craft has taken her places including a circus. Jaya’s latest Bangladeshi film Debi, which also ...

Entertainment »

Bijori takes break on her birthday


Sheikh Arif Bulbon :Bijori Barkatullah was one of the popular TV actresses of her generation. She is not only an actress but also a dance artiste, model and host. Today is her birthday. She takes break on her birthday. Before birthday she also worked. Bijori informed that yesterday she took ...

Sports »

Rooney excited to see what `fearless` England are capable of


AFP, Burton-On-Trent :Wayne Rooney will make his final farewell as England's greatest ever goalscorer in a friendly against the United States on Thursday, but is excited at what a young squad can achieve under "fearless" coach Gareth Southgate in the years to come.Rooney, 33, made the last of his 119 ...

Sports »

Shoulder injury rules Jason Holder out of Bangladesh tour


Agency :Windies suffered a big blow as captain Jason Holder was ruled out of the Bangladesh tour with a shoulder injury. Holder is said to have suffered the injury during the recent tour of India, and will need at least four weeks to recover from the setback."Jason has a partial ...

Editorial »

Time for fixing banking irregularities


THE Bangladesh Bank's role as the custodian of the production and distribution of money and credit in the economy has been eroded by the finance ministry in the past decade. It's not a common people's remark. Rather, it came from a Director of the central bank while addressing a meeting ...

Sports »

Los Angeles Clippers guard Sindarius Thornwell (left) and Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green scramble for a loose ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles on Monday.


Football »

Rooney excited for 'great moment' in England farewell


Wayne Rooney says he is honoured to make a final appearance for England and happy for manager Gareth Southgate to decide his playing time Thursday against the United States.Former Manchester United star Rooney, in video comments released Monday by his Major League Soccer club DC United, detailed his excitement at ...

City »

Chief Election Commissioner KM Nurul Huda, among others, at a press briefing for returning officers on the occasion of eleventh parliamentary election in the auditorium of Election Commission Secretariat in the city on Tuesday.


International »

Nobody can stand in its way in Pacific island cooperation: China


Reuters, Beijing :No country can block China's cooperation with island nations in the Pacific and the area is no country's sphere of influence, a senior diplomat said on Tuesday, ahead of a summit between President Xi Jinping and Pacific island leaders.Australia, in particular, has been vying for influence with China ...

International »

Israel-Gaza border facing most serious fighting since 2014 war


Reuters, Gaza :Israel launched more air strikes on Gaza on Tuesday as Palestinians kept up rocket fire on Israeli territory, in the worst surge of violence since a 2014 war.The fighting - that has killed six Palestinians, five of them militants, and a civilian in Israel since Monday -threatened to ...

Entertainment »

Oishee in China to win `Miss World` crown


Jannatul Ferdous Oishee crowned 'Miss Bangladesh 2018' on November 30. Now, she is in China for participating in the 'Miss World' beauty contest. There she will represent Bangladesh. On Saturday night at 1:00 am, Oishi left Dhaka for Sanya in China. And she reached there on Sunday morning.Swapan Chowdhury, chairman ...

Football »

New York City forward David Villa (7) movers the ball as Atlanta United defender Miles Robinson (12) defends during the first half of their MLS playoff soccer match in Atlanta on Sunday.


Football »

Ronaldo ends San Siro hoodoo as Juventus beat Milan 2-0


AP, Milan :Cristiano Ronaldo ended his San Siro hoodoo to help Juventus to a 2-0 win after AC Milan forward Gonzalo Higuain missed a penalty against his former team on Sunday.Higuain left Juventus in the offseason following the signing of Ronaldo and he had a nightmare game as he was ...

Editorial »

No development yet in city's road traffic management


THE directives to ensure discipline in traffic system issued by higher authorities have failed to bring any result. The traffic rule violation is still rampant. Almost all directives addressing owners and workers of city service buses and human haulers, pedestrians and drivers went unheeded. If the traffic management system returns ...

International »

California wildfires: Death toll reaches grim milestone


The death toll in wildfires sweeping California has risen to 31, with more than 200 people still unaccounted for, officials have said.Six more people were confirmed killed in the Camp Fire in the north of the state, taking the toll there to 29.That fire now equals the deadliest on record ...

 
Items that you save may be read at any time on your computer, iPad, iPhone or Android devices.
 
Are you new to our website? Do you have already an account at our website?
Create An Account Log in here
Email this news to a friend or like someone
Email:
Write a comment to this news