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19th-Nov-2020

Weak vigilance at airport helps addictive drug `ice` to enter the country

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A BANGLADESHI national in Malaysia has been smuggling the highly addictive drug "Ice," also known as "Crystal Meth," to Bangladesh for years through a handful of expatriates, who reportedly have no idea what they are bringing into the country. When these expatriates leave Malaysia for Bangladesh, the mastermind gives them small packets containing crystal meth - which looks like silica gel. Most of the time, these expatriates face no trouble at the Dhaka Airport while unknowingly smuggling packets full of the illegal drug. Even when the expatriates face questions about the substance from Dhaka Airport officials or at any checkpoints, members of the racket waiting nearby simply claim that the dangerously addictive drug is nothing, but a form of silica used to remove moisture from gold.
The Detective Branch (DB) of Dhaka Metropolitan Police unearthed the information after interrogating six people arrested on 4 November over suspected involvement in the smuggling and sale of crystal meth. The DB is now looking for the whereabouts of the Bangladeshi national living in Malaysia also used to smuggle crystal meth into Bangladesh from China and other countries. One of the arrestees, a dealer named Chandon Roy, used to sell crystal meth of every 10-gram sachet at Tk1 lakh. Using gold import and jewellery business as a front, Chandon was expanding his illegal trade of selling the drug in Dhaka. Chandon also used to import gold legally, but with each bar of 100-gram gold, he illegally imported crystal meth by falsely declaring the drug as a chemical for melting gold.
Businessmen, private university students and kids from rich families are the main consumers of crystal meth in Dhaka, and their number is no more than a hundred. Crystal meth is more powerful than Yaba tablets. The drug is mainly a nerve stimulant and its consumption increases hormonal arousal a thousand times more than usual. The drug also poses the risks of stroke, heart attack, teeth decay, and permanent hallucinations. Police should strongly handle crystal meth and protect citizens from dangerous drug exposure.