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06th-Apr-2015

NHRC chairman criticises tyrannical police behaviour but asks govt to be tough

By Editorial Desk

Chairman of National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) Dr Mizanur Rahman's remarks on what police say and what they actually do mocking the public trust and breaking laws in dealing with secretive detention; have at least brought an uneasy truth to the light. His comment that the police arrest a person four to five days back and then show his arrest on papers within 24 hours while producing before courts is an open secret now but what is at stake here is that they are destroying the foundation of the legal system and people's right to get justice.   
Dr Mizanur Rahman is not always on record speaking on human rights issues as strongly as this time. He made it clear that he is angry and disappointed at the deterioration of public safety and security. At a seminar at Jatiya Press Club on Saturday he was awfully outspoken about police behaviour castigating it to have become 'tyrannical.' 
The Chairman of the Commission was critical of tyrannical behaviour of the police but at the same time he advised the government to be as tough on the opposition activists as possible. What he should have appreciated, being a watchdog of our human rights violation, that tough police action is not the solution to political crisis. To believe in police power in dealing with political complications is to say that there would be no need of political leadership.
The problem with our NHRC is that it does not care to know the distinction between law and order situation and political crisis. Criticising the police but at the same time asking the government to be tough is a contradiction that must be avoided if human rights are to be protected. Dr Mizanur Rahman is a well-meaning person, but he has failed in his role dismally for his confusion.
Police brutalities take place in lawless land where bribes and corruption overtake dispensation of justice. We can't allow it to happen, said the NHRC Chairman.
But if the Human Rights Commission has not been performing a firm and consistent role on the side of human rights. If it cannot be honest to see that the police act as ordered by the government then the people are helpless from their own police and their own employed officials, including NHRC. They are not playing bravely in protection of their rights. This is also a national shame.
The Chairman of NHRC has made it weak and irrelevant for saving human rights and guiding the government along the path of human rights.
What should be clear to any sensible observer of the situation in the country is that the police toughness has made the violent elements better organised for inflicting more violence and civil war. Fighting BNP, a moderate party, is helping extremism. We should all be careful not to be complacent.