Headline
** We ask thieves to return the stolen public money as insisted by IMF ** Dhaka seeks oil from Riyadh on deferred payment ** Mango buds start appearing in many trees, in the middle of Poush and the beginning of Magh, has been a great surprise for many mango lovers. This photo was taken from Chattogram on Thursday. NN photo ** Voter turnout may be 15-25pc: CEC ** AL infighting in Narsingdi: 3 injured, 20 houses torched, attacked ** Ekushey Book Fair begins ** Cost goes up by Tk 1.61 lakh ** Half a million strike in UK's largest walkout in 12 years ** Flights to remain suspended for 5 hours every night in HSIA ** RAB rescues father hiding with Japanese daughter ** People don't need more government servants to make election cheating easier ** Bangladesh ranks 12th most corrupt country ** Power tariff hiked again ** DITF- 2023 ends with $39.48m export orders ** Children frolicking over a ride taking risks on Tuesday, as two dangerous high voltage transformers remain installed adjacent to a park of Old Dhaka’s Laxmi Bazar St. Gregory School. NN photo ** What action has been taken to prevent Dhaka's air pollution ** Blinken criticises settlements but stresses US support for Israel ** IMF approves $4.7 billion loan for Bangladesh ** Amar Ekushey Book Fair kicks off today ** We want to know how corruption is to be eliminated under a corrupt government ** Thousands of leaders and activists of BNP join the party's march programme towards Jurain from Jatrabari with banners, festoons, national flags and party flags in their hands on Monday. NN photo ** Foreign aids disbursement, commitment declined ** Awami League leaders and activists gather at a peaceful rally in front of party's central office at Bangabandhu Avenue in the capital on Monday which was arranged by Dhaka South City unit of Awami League. NN photo ** SSC, equivalent exams from April 30 ** HC issues rule on formulation of policy over handcuffing, shackling of accused **

More years spent in school linked to myopia risk

30 June 2014
More years spent in school linked to myopia risk


Life Desk :
Attaining higher levels of education and spending more years in school could increase the severity and prevalence of nearsightedness or myopia. Published online this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the research is the first population-based study to demonstrate that environmental factors may outweigh genetics in the development of myopia.
While common, nearsightedness has become even more prevalent around the world in recent years and presents a growing global health and economic concern. Severe nearsightedness is a major cause of visual impairment and is associated with greater risk of retinal detachment, myopic macular degeneration, premature cataracts and glaucoma. In the United States, nearsightedness now affects roughly 42 percent of the population. [1] Developed Asian countries report increasing myopia rates of up to 80 percent, the rapid growth rate of which suggests that environmental factors play a significant role. [2] Environmental factors that have been linked to myopia include near work (such as reading or using a computer), outdoor activity, living in urban versus rural areas and education.
To further analyze the association between myopia development and education, researchers at the University Medical Center in Mainz, Germany examined nearsightedness in 4,658 Germans ages 35 to 74, excluding anyone with cataracts or who had undergone refractive surgery. Results of their work, known as the Gutenberg Health Study, show that myopia appeared to become more prevalent as education level increased:
24 percent with no high school education or other training were nearsighted
35 percent of high school graduates and vocational school graduates were nearsighted
53 percent of university graduates were nearsighted
In addition to education levels completed, the researchers also found that people who spent more years in school proved to be more myopic, with nearsightedness worsening for each year of school. Furthermore, the researchers looked at the effect of 45 genetic markers, but found it a much weaker factor in the degree of nearsightedness compared to education level.
The antidote to the rise in myopia could be as simple as going outside more often. In the last several years, studies of children and young adults in Denmark and Asia show that more time outdoors and exposure to daylight is associated with less nearsightedness. [3]
"Since students appear to be at a higher risk of nearsightedness, it makes sense to encourage them to spend more time outdoors as a precaution," said Alireza Mirshahi, M.D., lead author of the study.

Add Rate