Commentary

Ways of gun power politics is known to the world but help may come too late

15 January 2022 Editorial Desk
Ways of gun power politics is known to the world but help may come too late


Editorial Desk :
What cannot be denied is that gun power politics survives through secret killings and forced disappearances. Recent newspaper report said police are coercing families of many enforced disappeared persons to sign in pre-written statements to say they have deliberately misled police concealing information about their missing family members.
Police officers are visiting victims' families and harassing their elders aiming at securing statement to deflect any reference of their involvement in kidnapping and killing of their loved ones who never returned.
We draw the attention of the authority, finding it difficult to believe such an insensible thing being done.
Our police should not be so ignorant that anything could be hidden from the world. There are independent sources for the United Nations and foreign embassies. Whether others will help us before it is too late – is a different matter.
As per human rights groups, families of most enforced-disappeared victims were not allowed to sue law enforcers when they went missing even though there was enough circumstantial evidence suggesting police involvement. In most cases victims' families were only allowed to file general dairies of a missing case blaming unidentified people to have picked the victims up.
Police allowed themselves for being so much abused for money that the attention of the world has been drawn making the enforcing worried. Instead of trying to rectify their action they are trying to make their position much stronger by suppressing the facts. But the world is not so ignorant about what is happening where as our greedy educated ones are. To the disbelief of many, police officials  
are now visiting families of victims to collect testimony that they were not involved in enforced disappearances.
A police officer of Sabujbagh Police Station on Monday went to the house of disappeared Chatra Dal leader, which is the student wing of main opposition BNP and wanted that the father of the victim to sign in the statement which would say his son was picked up by plainclothes men in 2013 and police had no role in it.
Mother of another victim reported that her son disappeared in 2013 and remained traceless so long until Tejgaon police visited her place thrice this week asking her to sign in the GD which would suggest police were not involved in his missing.
At least 10 such families were visited by police recently. Those were part of the United Nations Working Group on Enforced and Involuntary Disappearance's (WGEID) list of 76 unresolved cases. As per social media report the number of enforced disappeared persons is not less than 700 persons.

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