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** More curbs on govt officials’ foreign trips ** Children take bath in the Buriganga River in Dhaka to ward off the scorching summer heat. This photo was taken from Buriganga embankment on Monday. NN photo ** Taposh wants shops shut early ** Economists differ with 6.22 per cent inflation rate rather it is about 12 per cent ** Public transport services in capital New law with a provision Tk 5 crore fine on cards ** Sweden takes formal decision to apply for NATO membership ** Drug Admin bans eight types of medicines ** Interpol's Dhaka office requests India to send PK Halder back to Bangladesh ** Dollar price jumps to Tk87.50 ** PK Halder to be brought back following set procedure: FM ** Sri Lanka out of petrol, economy in a precarious condition: PM Wickremesinghe ** Social resistance against grabbers a must to protect Tangail, Gazipur hillocks ** PK Halder on 3-day remand in West Bengal ** In front of Gulshan Society Mosque in the capital, a vested quarter filling parts of Gulshan-Banani Lake creating a land bridge effectively bypassing security checkpoints that protect Gulshan North Diplomatic Zone. This photo was taken on Sunday. NN photo ** All necessary steps will be taken to bring PK Halder back: AG ** Russia's ‘brutal invasion’ of Ukraine is faltering: NATO ** Vladimir Putin ‘seriously ill’: Ex British spy claimed ** It may take three to six months to bring back PK Halder: ACC prosecutor ** Ten killed in ‘racially motivated’ shooting in Buffalo, US ** People stand in queue to buy mustard oil from a small mill at Bata Signal in the Elephant Road area of Dhaka on Sunday. One customer is allowed to buy maximum 2 litres of oil, depending on production. Agency photo ** Fugitive chops off policeman's hand in Ctg ** PK Halder hooked in Kolkata: Government's easy plundering policy created too many such cases ** One of PK Halder's mansions in Ward No. 15 of Ashoknagar in North 24 Parganas district which has been sealed by the ED. Photo: Collected ** Scamstar PK Halder arrested in India ** Worse still to come, Lanka’s new PM warns **

Ranil Wickremesinghe takes oath as Sri Lanka's PM

12 May 2022
Ranil Wickremesinghe takes oath as Sri Lanka's PM

Photo: Collected


AP, COLOMBO :

Five-time former Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe was reappointed Thursday in an effort to bring stability to the island nation, engulfed in a political and economic crisis.

Wickremesinghe took his oath before President Gotabaya Rajapaksa in a ceremony at the president’s residence. Protesters have blocked the entrance to the president's office for more than a month.

The president’s brother, Mahinda Rajakapsa, resigned as prime minister on Monday following violent attacks by supporters on peaceful anti-government protesters. His resignation automatically dissolved the Cabinet, leaving an administrative vacuum.

The president’s selection of Wickremesinghe is seen an attempt to end violence triggered by the crisis and restore international credibility as the government negotiates a bailout package with the International Monetary Fund.

On Wednesday, authorities deployed armored vehicles and troops in the streets of the capital after the attacks on protesters triggered a wave of violence across the country. Nine people died and more than 200 were injured.

Security forces have been ordered to shoot people deemed to be participating in the violence, as sporadic acts of arson and vandalism continue despite a strict nationwide curfew that began Monday evening.

For weeks, protesters have been demanding that both Rajapaksas resign over a debt crisis that has nearly bankrupted the country and caused severe shortages of fuel, food and other essentials.

Some opposition politicians and religious leaders objected to Wickremesinghe's appointment, saying citizens wanted sweeping reforms.

Opposition lawmaker Anura Dissananayake said the president’s choice of Wickremesinghe was more about protecting him and his family from public anger over his role in the economic crisis than solving the country’s problems.

When he was foreign minister from 2015 to 2019, Wickremesinghe was accused of protecting Rajapaksa’s powerful family from allegations of corruption and other wrongdoing.

Buddhist and Catholic clergy also objected to Wickremesinghe’s selection.

“This decision has been taken totally disregarding the aspirations of the people who are protesting today. The protests can only get worse by this decision,” said the Rev. Omalpe Sobitha a senior Buddhist monk.

Catholic Archbishop of Colombo Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith said for the country to move forward from its crisis, “we need a complete change of the system.”

Sri Lanka is nearly bankrupt and has suspended repayments of $7 billion in foreign loans due this year. The IMF has said any short or long-term assistance depends on the outcome of talks with creditors on loan restructuring. Sri Lanka must repay about $25 billion in foreign loans by 2026 out of a current total foreign debt of $51 billion.

The finance ministry said earlier this month that the country’s usable foreign reserves have plummeted to just $25 million.

The foreign currency shortage has forced a sharp decline in imports, leading to severe shortages of essentials such as fuel, cooking gas, food and medicine. For months, people have had to stand in long lines to buy limited supplies, with many returning empty handed.

The new prime minister will likely present a Cabinet list to the president for appointment, a power vested in him by the constitution. If there are any objections to the prime minister or the new Cabinet, lawmakers can submit a no-confidence motion to the house speaker when the body reconvenes on Tuesday. The motion would then be debated and voted on.

Wickremesinghe, 73, has been in Parliament for 45 years. His political party split in 2020 amid a leadership crisis and most senior members left to form a new party, which is currently the country’s main opposition.

Wickremesinghe’s reputation was damaged during his previous term as prime minister, when he was in a difficult power- sharing arrangement with then-President Maithripala Sirisena. Conflict and a communication breakdown between him and Sirisena were blamed for intelligence lapses that led to Easter Sunday suicide bomb attacks in 2019 that killed more than 260 people.

He was also accused of shielding a friend he appointed as head of the Central Bank from allegations of insider trading.

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