Headline
** Teletalk owes govt Tk 1695cr ** Imported meat causes threat to public health ** Survivors give harrowing accounts ** Death toll crosses 5100 ** UN chief fears world is heading toward a wider war ** ‘IMF loan programme can be touchstone of financial sector reforms’ ** Wayfarers walk taking risks over a wide drain at Kakrail area in the capital on Tuesday, as construction work is going on there slowly. NN photo ** Covid tests begins with home made kit ** HSC results to be published today ** Turkey declares state of emergency for quake zone ** Slow place in Dhaka’s canals demarcation not acceptable ** Powerful earthquakes jolt Turkey and Syria ** Apparel sector eyes $15b Indian raw material support ** Belgium's Queen Mathilde Marie Christine visits corporate building, production house, day-care centre and different parts of knit composite manufacturing company Fakir Apparels Limited in Narayanganj district on Monday. PID photo ** President and PM express shock over quake in Turkey, Syria ** DB's final report clears Bushra, settles on suicide ** Turkey earthquake is country's worst disaster in 84 years: Erdogan ** IMF’s loan condition Additional Tk 65,000cr to be collected next year ** Major earthquake in Turkey, Syria kills nearly 2,300 people ** Bangladesh not sure to what end Indo-Bangladesh friendship is leading under Mr Modi's anti-Muslim stance ** PATHETIC INDEED! Geeta Biswas, a poor woman, failed to purchase OMS (open market sale) rice after standing in a long queue for hours. At last, she climbed into the truck for rice. When she tried to pick up the scattered rice in bags from the truck, the sellers took away the bags from her. Later she picked and took about one and a half kilos of rice. This photo was taken from Agrabad Government Commerce College area in Chattogram on Sunday. Agency photo ** Sending migrant workers BD-Malaysia agree to review MoU signed in 2021 ** Draft data protection law is a matter of concern: US envoy ** Pakistani former President Pervez Musharraf dies ** GDP growth in FY22 reaches 7.10pc **

US court dismisses suit against Saudi prince in killing

07 December 2022
US court dismisses suit against Saudi prince in killing

File photo


AP, WASHINGTON :

A U.S. federal judge on Tuesday dismissed a lawsuit against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the killing of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, bowing to the Biden administration’s insistence that the prince was legally immune in the case.


District of Columbia U.S. District Judge John D. Bates heeded the U.S. government’s motion to shield Prince Mohammed from the lawsuit despite what Bates called “credible allegations of his involvement in Khashoggi’s murder.”


A team of Saudi officials killed Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in 2018. Khashoggi, a columnist for The Washington Post, had written critically of the harsh ways of Prince Mohammed, Saudi Arabia’s de facto ruler.


The U.S. intelligence community concluded the Saudi crown prince ordered the operation against Khashoggi. The killing opened a rift between the Biden administration and Saudi Arabia that the administration has tried in recent months to close, as the U.S. unsuccessfully urged the kingdom to undo oil production cuts in a global market racked by the Ukraine war.


Khashoggi had entered the Saudi consulate to obtain documents needed for his upcoming marriage. His fiancee, Hatice Cengiz, who had waited unknowingly outside the consulate as he was killed, and a rights group founded by Khashoggi before he died brought the lawsuit. The lawsuit also named two top aides of the prince as accomplices.


The Biden administration, invited but not ordered by the judge to offer an opinion on the matter, declared last month that Prince Mohammed’s standing as Saudi Arabia’s prime minister gave him sovereign immunity from the U.S. lawsuit.


Saudi Arabia’s king, Salman, had named Prince Mohammed, his son, as prime minister weeks earlier. It was a temporary exemption from the kingdom’s governing code, which makes the king prime minister.


Khashoggi’s fiancee and his rights group argued the move was a maneuver to shield the prince from the U.S. court.


Bates expressed “uneasiness” with the circumstances of Prince Mohammed’s new title, and wrote in Tuesday’s order that “there is a strong argument that plaintiffs’ claims against bin Salman and the other defendants are meritorious.”


But the government’s finding that Prince Mohammed was immune left him no choice but to dismiss the prince as a plaintiff, the judge wrote. He also dismissed the two other Saudi plaintiffs, saying the U.S. court lacked jurisdiction over them.


The Biden administration argued longstanding legal precedent on immunity for heads of government from other nations’ courts, in some circumstances, demanded that the prince be shielded as prime minister, regardless of the prince only recently obtaining the title.


The Biden administration already had spared Prince Mohammed from government penalties in the case, again citing sovereign immunity. Rights groups and Saudi exiles argued that sparing Prince Mohammed from accountability in Khashoggi’s killing would give the crown prince and other authoritarian rulers around the world a green light for future abuses.

Add Rate